Continuous Improvement Briefs

  • Approaches to Reducing Chronic Absenteeism

    Mary Perry, Michael A. Gottfried, Kiarah Young, Cecelia Colchico, Kathy Lee, Hedy Chang Policy Analysis for California Education July 2019

    Acknowledging the importance of students simply being in school, California has made student attendance part of its accountability system. This brief covers a session in which it was pointed out that using chronic absenteeism as an accountability measure is new and its underlying causes are not well understood. Even as many schools face the expectation that they take action to address high rates of absenteeism, myths about school attendance persist.

  • Empowering the Intersegmental Agenda: Opportunities for Research, Policy, and Practice

    Sherrie Reed, Cecilia Rios-Aguilar, Elisha Smith Arrillaga, Joel Vargas, Michal Kurlaender Policy Analysis for California Education June 2019

    Due to fragmented and misaligned segments of public education, many students lack access to educational opportunities that will ensure their success in college and career. This problem is one that may only be solved through better alignment and coordination between high school and college, between systems of higher education, and between education and economic development sectors.

  • Developing a Comprehensive Data System to Further Continuous Improvement in California

    Julia E. Koppich, Evan White, Simon Kim, Marcy Lauck, Noah Bookman, Andrea Venezia Policy Analysis for California Education May 2019

    Governor Gavin Newsom’s budget proposal for 2019–2020 includes $10 million to develop a statewide longitudinal data system—including early education, K–12, and higher education institutions as well as health and human services agencies— to better track student outcomes and improve alignment of the education system to workforce needs.

  • Promising Practices in Local Stakeholder Engagement in School Governance

    Mary Perry, Beth Higbee, Danny Kanga, Celia Jaffe, Geordee Mae Corpuz Policy Analysis for California Education April 2019

    Community engagement remains one of the most challenging expectations of California’s Local Control  Funding Formula, so much so that state leaders have funded an initiative to support regional networks focused on engagement. This brief shares insights from a session where a lead administrator from the San Bernardino County Office provided an update on that initiative. Other speakers shared their on-the-ground experiences working with educators, parents, and students to create the relationships needed for community stakeholder engagement to be consistent, meaningful, and productive.

  • Special Education in California Schools: The Challenges and Solutions from Multiple Perspectives

    Sherrie Reed January 2019

    This PACE policy brief identifies needed additional policy action needed to increase equity and improve outcomes for students with disabilities that persist in many school districts. The brief also highlights the endeavors of several public school districts where district leaders, school administrators, and classroom teachers are finding ways to meet the needs of students with disabilities in the current policy context.

  • Advancing Equity Through the Local Control Funding Formula: Promising Practices

    Julia E. Koppich December 2018

    California’s Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) ushered in a new era for California education policy. Enacted in 2013, the LCFF shifted control of most education dollars from the state to local school districts, allowing them to determine how to allocate their resources to best meet the needs of the students in their community. The LCFF also made it a matter of state policy to shine a spotlight on educational inequities and try to give districts the wherewithal to level the playing field for students who too often are left behind.

  • Fostering Pre-K to Elementary Alignment and Continuity in Mathematics in Urban School Districts: Challenges and Possibilities

    Cynthia Coburn, Elizabeth Friedmann, Kelly McMahon, Graciela Borsato, Abigail Stein, Natalie Jou, Seenae Chong, Rebekah LeMahieu, Megan Franke, Sonia Ibarra, Deborah J. Stipek Policy Analysis for California Education November 2018

    In recent years, California has invested in improving early childhood education programs. Research shows the importance of high-quality early childhood education, but the disconnect from K–12 education threatens its long-term benefits. If the early grades do not build on the gains made in preschool, they likely will be lost. This brief, based on a longer technical report , describes the challenges facing pre-K–3 alignment and offers promising practices and policy recommendations.

  • Intersegmental Partnerships and Data Sharing: Promising Practices From the Field

    Sherrie Reed, Patrick Lee, Michal Kurlaender, Ambar Hernandez Policy Analysis for California Education July 2018

    Collaboration between K–12 public school districts and higher education, as well as between education institutions, workforce groups, and community organizations, has the potential to improve college and labor market outcomes for individual students and for local communities. However, improvement efforts demand the use of longitudinal data to define the problem, set goals, and monitor progress. California has been behind in building such a longitudinal data system—linked across pre-K through postsecondary sectors—to track individuals’ education and labor market outcomes.

  • Enacting Social-Emotional Learning: Practices and Supports Employed in CORE Districts and Schools

    Julie A. Marsh, Susan McKibben, Heather Hough, Michelle Hall, Taylor N. Allbright, Ananya M. Matewos, Caetano Siqueira Policy Analysis for California Education April 2018

    Social-emotional learning refers to the beliefs, attitudes, personality traits, and behaviors that students need to succeed in school and life. Our study looks closely at ten “outlier schools” in California’s CORE districts whose students report strong social-emotional learning outcomes compared to other, similar middle schools.

  • Community Collaboration in Teacher Recruitment and Retention

    Sherrie Reed Policy Analysis for California Education January 2018

    High quality instruction delivered by effective teachers is the key to student success. Hiring, developing and retaining good teachers are therefore the most important tasks of our public schools. The tasks of teacher recruitment and retention have traditionally been delegated to the human resource department within school districts, but leaving these critical responsibilities to a single office is no longer sufficient. The ability to find, support, and keep good teachers is a community challenge, which demands innovative solutions collaboratively developed by diverse stakeholders.

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