Luis A. Huerta

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Luis A. Huerta
Associate Professor of Education and Public Policy,
Teachers College–Columbia University

Luis A. Huerta is an associate professor of education and public policy at Teachers College, Columbia University. He teaches courses in policy analysis and implementation, school finance, and organizational sociology. His research on school choice reforms examines policies that advance both decentralized and market models of schooling—including charter schools, vouchers, tuition tax credits, homeschooling, and virtual schools. He previously served as a research associate and coordinator for K–12 education policy research for PACE and as a California public school teacher. Huerta received his PhD in education policy from the University of California, Berkeley.

updated 2001

Publications by Luis A. Huerta
Research Center Celebrates a Quarter Century as Leader in Legislative Policy Analysis
When PACE was founded in the early 1980s, California's schools were in turmoil following the passage of Proposition 13, which indirectly limited public education funding. Twenty-five years later, in 2008, Proposition 13 is still intact, the state's…
The Influence of State Policy and Community
Recent findings show that students attending charter schools in the United States achieve at comparable or lower levels to those enrolled in regular public schools, perhaps due to uneven quality and disparities in the levels of resources acquired by…
Spinning Out the Implications of the Improved School Finance
Surely revenues are central to the quality of schooling—nearly everybody thinks so. Generations of reformers have come along, each needing more money. Advo­cates for equity have rediscovered inequalities in spending nearly every decade, from Ellwood…
California Policy, the 'Improved School Finance,' and the Williams Case
This article applies the logic of the ‘‘improved’’ school finance, arguing the need to understand how resources are used at the school and classroom levels. While California policies and most court cases have been seriously inadequate from this…