New Reports

Hans Fricke, Susanna Loeb, Robert H. Meyer, Andrew B. Rice, Libby Pier, Heather Hough

School value-added models are increasingly used to measure schools’ contributions to student success. At the same time, policymakers and researchers agree that schools should support students’ social-emotional learning (SEL) as well as academic development. Yet, the evidence regarding whether schools can influence SEL and whether statistical growth models can appropriately measure this influence is limited.

Heather Hough

Student absenteeism has recently entered the national spotlight with its emphasis in the Every Student Succeeds Act, and here in California with its inclusion in the School Dashboard. Yet many questions remain about who chronically absent students are and how they are concentrated within schools. In chapter 1 (of the edited book, Absent from School), the author uses data from the CORE districts—which serve nearly one million students in over 1,000 schools in California–to better understand differences across students and schools, comparing these measures to a broader set of school performance indicators. First, the author describes attendance at the student level and how it varies by student characteristics. Then, she shows how schools perform on this metric, by school type, by subgroup, and across time. Finally, she describes how schools’ performance on chronic absence metrics corresponds to other accountability metrics and the related implications for reporting school-level measures of chronic absenteeism.

Purchase book

Projects

  • College and career readiness is at the heart of California’s State Standards. This project examines many aspects of these standards, including how well they correlate with measures of postsecondary success across the State’s three segments of higher education.

  • Getting Down to Facts II provides in-depth analysis of the state education system as of 2018 and looks at what is working well and where improvement is still needed. The report’s findings are contained in 35 separate studies thoroughly researched by over 100 leading academics from top research institutions across California and the United States.

  • The Local Control Funding Formula Research Collaborative (LCFFRC) brings together a diverse set of policy experts who, since 2014, have been documenting implementation of the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF), California’s pathbreaking finance and governance system.

  • Calls for “continuous improvement” in California’s K-12 education system are central to current discussions about school improvement in the state. This project seeks to define continuous improvement both in theory and in practice and support it at all levels of the system.

  • This research partnership is focused on producing research that informs continuous improvement in the CORE Districts and policy and practice in California and beyond.

  • Alignment in preschool and early elementary experiences can improve student outcomes. This project provides ways to improve alignment across grades in such elements as standards, assessments, curricula, and instructional strategies.

  • This work documents the important collaboration between LEAs, higher education segments, workforce groups, and community organizations to improve college and labor market outcomes across California communities.

Policy Analysis for California Education

 
Policy Analysis for California Education (PACE) is an independent, non-partisan research center led by faculty directors at Stanford University, the University of Southern California, the University of California Davis, the University of California Los Angeles, and the University of California Berkeley. PACE seeks to define and sustain a long-term strategy for comprehensive policy reform and continuous improvement in performance at all levels of California’s education system, from early childhood to postsecondary education and training. PACE bridges the gap between research and policy, working with scholars from California’s leading universities and with state and local policymakers to increase the impact of academic research on educational policy in California.

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