Published
Summary
Although all students change schools when they are promoted from one school level to another, some students also move from one school to another for reasons other than promotion. The practice of students making non-promotional school changes is referred to as student mobility. Past research has documented that student mobility is widespread in the United States and often detrimental to the educational achievement of students. Yet little of this research has focused on the secondary level or examined mobility from the school perspective. This study examined three important aspects of student...
A Plan for California’s Schools
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Summary
Nearly five years ago, in fall 1990, PACE issued a reform plan for California schools. The state's schools faced enormous challenges and, PACE then asserted, only a systematic, all-encompassing approach to reform could help meet students' diverse and growing needs. PACE acknowledged that California had taken some important steps toward education reform, but much remained to be accomplished. The challenges PACE pointed to in 1990 have not abated. If anything, they have intensified. They revolve around three key issues: explosive growth, increasing diversity, and lagging student achievement...
Financial Analysis
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Summary
On November 2, 1993, Californians will face their most important education decision since the state's formation. Ballot Proposition 174, if enacted, will amend the state constitution and establish "scholarships" redeemable by parents for their children's kindergarten through 12th grade schooling. If this ballot measure passes, public schools will continue to exist, as will today's many kinds of private schools. However, alongside of these two conventional schooling alternatives will be a third choice, "scholarship redeeming schools." These new schools will be paid for, or at least financially...
Overview of PACE Analysis
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Summary
PACE has analyzed the financial, legal, and social ramifications of Proposition 174, the school choice initiative, so as to provide Californians and policymakers with accurate, unbiased information. This packet contains important questions and answers about the initiative, summaries of PACE's financial analysis and polling report, and background information on PACE and its directors.
The School Voucher Initiative
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Summary
On November 2, 1993, Californians will decide whether to amend the California Constitution according to the provisions of the "Parental Choice in Education Initiative," Proposition 174. PACE has undertaken an analysis of the initiative's provisions. This analysis is intended to provide policymakers, parents, educators, and mem­bers of the general public with objective information. PACE is not taking a position on the initiative. Rather, the PACE analysis reviews significant components of the initiative and raises the policy questions and issues for voters to consider. PACE has produced...
Publication authors
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Summary
A cornerstone of California's education reform strategy is the creation of a series of high quality curriculum frameworks designed to upgrade K–12 education in the state. The frameworks raise expectations of students' knowledge and understanding of language arts, mathematics, science, and history/social science. They focus on learning for understanding, as well as thinking, problem solving, and using knowledge in practical, real-life situations. More specifically, the goals of the frameworks are to introduce a curriculum which can be used for all students and produce students who know how to...
Publication author
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Summary
The good news is that academic achievement among California's public school students is improving. The bad news is that it still has farther to go before being able to meet so-called "world class standards." More troublesome yet, the state presently is beset by a complex web of troubling conditions which severely threaten continued education reform. Dramatically increasing enrollments, declin­ing real revenues, and debilitating political issues are combining to distract from a concentrated state effort to improve California's schools. Each of these conditions, as well as student performance...
Publication author
Published
Summary
California's public schools have been trapped in the state's fiscal and political gridlock. Since the 1983 reforms, California has not supported a cohesive education reform strategy. Further, a series of publicly enacted initiatives, including Proposition 13, the Gann Limit, and Proposition 98 have severely limited the ability of state policymakers to fund schools adequately, and have curtailed the ability of local leaders to add to the education funding pot. Higher-than-projected enrollment growth and the 1991 recession exacerbated the education funding crunch. Dramatically improving...
Publication author
Published
Summary
Across the United States, funding for education has shown tremendous growth since World War II. After taking inflation and student enrollment increases into account. spending for our nation's schools increased by 67 percent in the 1960s, 35 percent in the 1970s, and 30 percent in the 1980s. In California, real spending per pupil for education grew 13 percent between 1980-81 and 1990-91. Why, in the wealthiest state in the nation, has the growth in spending for schools lagged behind other states? There are a number of plausible explanations. including the taxpayer revolt of the late 1970s, the...