Past Events

Mar
4
2022
Charting a Path to Equity
Topic

In today’s data-rich, technology-enhanced world, math learning opportunities are central to the path to higher education and 21st-century careers. Math classes must serve as stepping stones rather than stopping points on students’ journeys. Ensuring that happens means policies, practices, and perceptions must change to lower the systemic barriers that block some students’ paths forward, especially by race and gender. To learn more about and support new strategies that enhance deeper learning and equitable outcomes.

Dec
16
2021
Topic

Efforts being made around the country to encourage educational reform in the areas of equity, access, diversity, and inclusion may be viewed as only for show. How can we shift away from performative demonstrations of support and “blame the victim” theories, such as deficit thinking, that suggest people are responsible for their predicaments, rather than the biased systems that surround them? Cecilia Rios-Aguilar explores how students’ cultural experiences can be used to develop strategies to overcome disparities and enact long-term normative change.

Mar
26
2020
New Research on Statewide College Outcomes and District Approaches for Improvement
Topic

In this seminar, we will present a comprehensive overview of California’s college readiness metrics and new statewide data on college persistence and completion. In addition, we describe the efforts of several public school districts to improve postsecondary access and success for all students, and to close persistent gaps by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status.

Feb
11
2020
What’s Next for Dual Enrollment in California?
Topic
Dual enrollment enables students to take college courses while they are still in high school, which makes it more likely that they will graduate from high school and that they will also enroll and succeed in college. Join us for a webinar with several experts including Michal Kurlaender, chair of education policy in the UC Davis School of Education, PACE Faculty Director, and co-author of the report on dual enrollment, to learn more about the potential of this practice in California and what needs to be done to make this opportunity more available to all students in California.
Feb
7
2020
Evidence to Advance Equity and Excellence in California’s Cradle-to-Career Vision
Topic

PACE’s annual conference brings together nearly 300 California policymakers, researchers, and education leaders to discuss new research and approaches to improving educational outcomes for California’s students, from early childhood through higher education.

Nov
22
2019
Re-evaluating College Admissions
Topic

College access is more important than ever, and the time is right for a fresh look at the research on college admissions and the implications for education equity. PACE and UC Berkeley bring together an amazing group of policymakers, practitioners, and researchers. Speakers include leaders from the State Board of Education, each of California’s institutions of higher education (UC, CSU, and community colleges), K-12 school districts, the College Board, and advocacy organizations, along with experts in college admissions and access from universities across California and nationwide.

May
19
2017
Lessons from Regional Cross-Sector Collaborations
Topic

JFF will briefly present key findings from a recently released study on the second year of CCPT implementation (2015-2016) that focuses largely on three issues: changing mindsets about career and technical education, improving communication among stakeholders, and building sustainable regional networks. The seminar will highlight CCPT implementation successes and challenges through the lens of regional career pathway development, particularly the connections between school districts and community colleges and ideas for strengthening them.

Feb
19
2016
Implementing SB 1440 in California Community Colleges
Topic

Most of the students who set out to earn degrees in California Community Colleges never do. The reasons behind these low rates of persistence and completion have long been a focus of policy and popular concern, and a variety of strategies have been adopted to tackle the problem. In this seminar, Rachel Baker will present findings that show how students, and schools, reacted to SB 1440, which created the Associates Degree for Transfer.

Mar
13
2015
Assessing Intended and Unintended Consequences
Topic

Michal Kurlaender and Jacob Jackson present research following up on their statewide evaluation of California’s Early Assessment Program (EAP), an academic preparation program developed jointly by the California Department of Education, the California State Board of Education, and the California State University and implemented in 2004. The goals of the EAP are to bridge the gap between K-12 educational standards in English and mathematics and the requirements and expectations of postsecondary education. In this seminar, Kurlaender and Jackson present new findings on EAP effects at California

May
16
2014
The College Readiness Indicator System
Topic

Gardner Center staff and two institutional partners at the University of Chicago and Brown University, developed and studied the implementation of a CRIS in five urban school districts across the country. The seminar will present the recently-released CRIS Resource Series, including a menu of research-based indicators and six essential elements of CRIS implementation. The seminar includes a discussion of how districts, schools, and state agencies can use a college readiness indicator system to fulfill college readiness mandates and advance equitable access to deeper learning opportunities.

Apr
19
2013
Topic

In this seminar Daniel Solorzano and Amanda Datnow present findings from a study focusing on young adults in poverty, many of whom are enrolled in community colleges. Their study is guided by the premise that it is important to take an asset-based approach to understanding youth in poverty and their communities. They argue to truly expand opportunities for success educational institutions must find a way to build on current strengths in families and communities. The project seeks to understand what knowledge and tools are needed to maximize postsecondary opportunities for low-income youth.

Apr
5
2013
How High Schools Can Be Held Accountable for Developing Students' Career Readiness
Topic

In this seminar, Svetlana Darche and David Stern focus on the practical question of how high schools might be held accountable for developing students' career readiness. Their goal is to propose a feasible indicator of high school students' career readiness that could be included among the measures used by states to hold schools accountable, and would complement and enhance the assessments of proficiency in academic subjects. Such an indicator could address the requirement for a career readiness measure as stated in a new provision of the California Education Code.

Dec
14
2012
Topic

In this seminar Russell Rumberger from UC-Santa Barbara will present findings from his research on the causes and consequences of dropping out in California as part of the California Dropout Research Project, and from his recent book, Dropping Out, from a national perspective. He will address four facets of California’s dropout crisis: the severity of the problem and whether it’s getting better or worse; the individual and social consequences of dropping out; the reasons why students drop out of school; and changes in policy and educational practice that can help to address the problem.

Apr
20
2012
Understanding Differences and Similarities Through the Lens of the Health Sciences
Topic

As California implements the Common Core State Standards and discusses ways to better link K–12 and postsecondary education systems, it is critical to understand how well the state’s current postsecondary and career readiness standards relate to each other and to the Common Core. The panelists will discuss initial findings from a project focused on whether college and career readiness standards in the Health Sciences (entry-level in postsecondary, entry-level in the workforce, and exit-level in high school) require the same levels and types of knowledge and skills. Speaker: Andrea Venezia

Mar
16
2012
California’s Early Assessment Program and the Transition to College
Topic

The Early Assessment Program is an academic preparation program developed jointly by the California Department of Education, the State Board of Education, and the California State University. In this seminar, we present new results from a statewide study of the impact of the EAP on both student and school outcomes. We discuss how schools have responded to the EAP, given the voluntary nature of the program, and present findings from a new study evaluating the effect of the EAP on students’ likelihood for remediation once they arrive at a CSU campus.

Dec
9
2011
Topic

To improve the preparation of California high school students for postsecondary education and careers, in 2006 the James Irvine Foundation launched a major initiative to develop what is now called the Linked Learning approach. The Foundation asked PACE to inform this effort by gathering evidence on the cost of Linked Learning programs. David Stern of the University of California, Berkeley, will present results from the new study of CPAs and from the PACE study of costs.

Oct
7
2011
Topic

In this seminar researchers will summarize the results of a system-wide inventory of CTE programs, by college, that suggests the need for far more attention to developing coherent program structures that deliver value to students and employers. They will discuss some of the challenges facing the colleges presented by the organizational structure around the CTE and workforce development mission and draw some contrasts with other states that have assigned a higher priority to the CTE mission.

May
6
2010
Postsecondary Capacity, the Master Plan, and the Role of For-Profit and Private Institution
Topic

California participates in President Obama’s goal of increasing participation in postsecondary education the state needs to add roughly 100,000 students a year for the next ten years. Public institutions do not have the ability to meet these needs under current fiscal and structural constraints. What might be the role of private and for-profit colleges and universities in meeting the needs of the state? In this seminar, William G. Tierney addresses this question and more.

Apr
16
2010
Topic

In 2005-06 almost half of the pupils in California’s public schools were Latinos, but Latinos only received about 15 percent of the BA degrees awarded by public and private colleges in the state. Texas has a comparable Latino population but does significantly better than California in getting Latino students through college. In this seminar, Martin Carnoy explored the reasons why California’s education system falls short in ensuring post-secondary access and success for Latino students and identifies steps that the state could take to increase the number of four-year college graduates.

Mar
26
2010
Topic

Community colleges are the first point of access to public higher education for many language-minority students who attended CA high schools. These students face language-related challenges that present potential barriers to completing academic goals. Community colleges struggle to meet the needs of those who do not fit the linguistic profiles of monolingual English-speakers in developmental English courses nor of ESL programs. In this seminar, George Bunch presents his research on language testing and placement policies and practices while discussing implications for policy.

Feb
26
2010
Topic

The Early Assessment Program is an academic preparation program developed by the California Department of Education, the State Board of Education, and CSU. The stated purpose of the program, now in its fifth year, is to bridge the gap between K-12 educational standards in English and mathematics and the requirements and expectations of postsecondary education at the California State University. In this seminar Michal Kurlaender and Jessica Howell discuss how participation in the Early Assessment Program affects college going behavior and the need for remediation in college.

Feb
12
2010
Topic

The CAHSEE has been criticized as being unfair to English Learners, special education students and some racial groups, as well as being ineffective in raising student achievement. Some have called for eliminating passage of the CAHSEE as a graduation requirement for CA students. In this seminar, Julian Betts discusses whether the requirement and funding for intervention is helping or hurting students academically, with a focus on who has been failing the exam, how early we can identify students at risk of failing, and when school districts might intervene to help students at risk of failure.

Dec
11
2009
Findings and Policy Implications
Topic

The ADP has sought to strengthen alignment between standards and expectations in K-12 schools and post-secondary education and training. In the first year the ADP has worked toward agreement on a common standard of readiness for non-remedial college coursework across the three segments of California’s higher education system. In this seminar, members of the ADP team discuss progress to date and next steps in the effort to ensure that more California students are prepared for success in college and careers.

Apr
24
2009
Topic

In this seminar, Sean Reardon and Michal Kurlaender will present student-level data from four large California school districts was used to examine the impact of the California High School Exit Examination exam on student achievement and graduation rates. In particular, they focus of the effects of failing vs. passing the CAHSEE in 10th grade on the subsequent achievement and graduation rate of students with relatively low math and ELA skills.

Apr
10
2009
Creating the Best Conditions for Community College Student Success
Topic

California’s community colleges serve nearly three-quarters of public postsecondary enrollments in the state and are critical to meet today’s needs for a highly educated workforce and citizenry. State public policies create the conditions under which the colleges operate to serve students’ needs and contribute to the economy. In this seminar, Nancy Shulock makes the case for supplementing ongoing efforts to increase student success with changes to policies in order to provide more favorable conditions under which the colleges can meet the needs of students and the state of California.